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Veteran Contributor
ric47
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎10-22-2009

Which type of turner are you?

Going back and from some comments I have heard their are many different types of turners I think. I can see the different types in the club I belong to. It would be interesting to hear other ideas on what a turner really is.

 

Let me explain the types I see:

1. First is the guy that looks at a tree and says I would sure like to have a bowl blank from that crotch. He wants it cut into a blank before he will take the wood. Maybe he would rather have it cut into pen blanks. He will get it turned before spring.

2. Second guy looks at the tree and says I would like to have that crotch. He will take the whole crotch home and cut in in half and make two bowls out of it. Maybe this month.

3. This one says I want that limb with the crotch. He has it figured out that the limb will give him enough wood to turn for the next year. He may cut some of it into blanks and seal them to set on the shelf until he is ready.

4. Then there is the guy who will take a few logs and take them home and seal the ends. A year from now he is still using the excuse they aren't dry enough yet to turn, but he will get started on them soon.

5. Then we have the class I fall into. Nice tree, about 3 loads on my trailer and I can get it home. This should last me a month I hope. You first 4 classes take what you want and anything left over 6" I will take.

 

I also find some other types:

1. If it isn't a perfect sized pen or bowl blank they don't want it. Haven't they realized that the original shape is all going to be turned round and to be shaped to make the project from the inside of the blank. A blank doesn't have to be surfaced on 4 sides and into an exact square with squared off ends. Oh yes, I forgot it is dry!

2. Will take some stock that is rough cut on the bandsaw or maybe the chainsaw. Only wants 3-4 peices though.

3. This guy will take all of the rough turned dry bowls you will give him. He will take them home to dry more in case he gets the urge to turn in the next year.

4. Then there is me, don't offer it if your want it because I will probably load it all up.

 

Then what makes a turner:

1. He turns one or two projects a month. Yes they may be nice enough to go into the best of the art galeries.

2. Turns a little each week and some on weekends and then gives most of the stuff away after he has filled his house.

3. Turns when he has time and does a few craft shows.

4. Or my class that turns about every day and just stacks the stuff up. Sometimes people stop by and I sell a few things.

 

I guess we are all in it for different reasons and at different levels. Myself I enjoy getting all the wood I can and spending all the time I can on the lathe. I don't have time trying to go to craft sells, too much wood to turn and more is probably on the way because I never turn down wood. I get obsessed with turning all I can every day. I do not take the time to make gallery projects, I turn for the fun of using up wood in to utility type peices. Some may have some marks and the finish may not be super gloss, but it is a peice to be used and not worry about getting it chipped or scratched. I enjoy turning, I hate finishing, and I don't have time to try to sell the stuff.

 

So what class do you fall into?

Honored Advisor
johnclucas
Posts: 2,028
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

Rick  good question.   I work a more than full time job so it's hard for me to spend enough time turning.   I get free wood.  Seal the ends and hopefully in a week to a month get around to harvesting some of it into bowl blanks or rough turned bowls.  Maybe in the same week I will  turn some of the green wood into completed bowls or hollow vessels. 

    If the wood starts to crack very much I try to harvest it into spindle squares, 4x4, 3x3,etc usually about 24" long.  I'll put these up to dry for later use on spindle or box projects.

     I turn mostly dry wood.   Either wood I've purchased for hand mirrors or use scraps for ornaments.  I also turn boxes and such that need dry wood and I also turn the roughed out bowls that are also dry at that time.

     Some months I turn quite a few projects, some are just craft sales stuff and there might be some finer quality hollow vessels or bowls.    About 2 or 3 times a year I'll produce a piece that is more "art" than craft.

     Right now I sell through 2 galleries but not a lot of work.   I need to start doing craft shows but that is hard to do when you never know when you will have to work on a weekend.  It might be the weekend you planned to do that show.   I need to make money with my turnings due to budget cuts at work so I've got to work something out.

Veteran Contributor
ric47
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

[ Edited ]

John it sounds like you have a system that works good for you. I see you like turning dry so it makes sense to cut the logs into blanks to help in drying. I tend to leave them as logs until I use them. But it looks like you are getting in some good turning time.

Community Manager
MSWOODcraft
Posts: 5,246
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

[ Edited ]

VERY interesting notions.

 

Which type am I?   I'm actually a whole 'nother type entirely.    I don't wake up and then decide that today it's time to turn something.   What I primarily use my lathe for is to create elements that go on my furniture projects.   That could be all the spindles for a rocking chair, it could be a bun foot, it could be a decorative pilaster for a clock.  

 

I rarely turn independent, stand-alone pieces at the lathe.   Sure, I've done a bunch, and I learned a lot on them (with some spectacular failures along the way).   Every once in a while I get the hankering to spin some wood to make something pretty, and I've got a big chunk of elm burl that's waiting for just such an inspiration.  But for me that's about once a year, at best.  

 

So for me and in my work I'm making supplemental elements for larger forms.

Best,

Matt Seiler
Wood Online Moderator

Advisor
Randy@Yorktown
Posts: 1,225
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

[ Edited ]

MSWOODcraft wrote:

VERY interesting notions.

 

Which type am I?   I'm actually a whole 'nother type entirely.    I don't wake up and then decide that today it's time to turn something.   What I primarily use my lathe for is to create elements that go on my furniture projects.   That could be all the spindles for a rocking chair, it could be a bun foot, it could be a decorative pilaster for a clock.  

 

I rarely turn independent, stand-alone pieces at the lathe.   Sure, I've done a bunch, and I learned a lot on them (with some spectacular failures along the way).   Every once in a while I get the hankering to spin some wood to make something pretty, and I've got a big chunk of elm burl that's waiting for just such an inspiration.  But for me that's about once a year, at best.  

 

So for me and in my work I'm making supplemental elements for larger forms.

 

I'm in the same category as Matt.  However, I am finally contemplating the purchase of my first scroll chuck after turning spindles for about 15 years.  Ok, I have at least used my faceplate occasionally.  It has taken awhile for me to get here, but the ideal of turning some of the more artistic stuff is becoming more and more appealing as I look down the road at retirement.


 

Advisor
Rrandy
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎11-05-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

3...4...and 2.5   I'm still learning so some of my "art" ends up splitting/checking or wierd looking or, rarely but it happens, just plumb ugly. No matter the outcome I have fun and I think maybe that's the bottom line.

Never do anything you don't want to explain to the EMT.

Veteran Contributor
ric47
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

That is the name of the game. No matter what or how you turn, IT HAS TO BE FUN.

Frequent Contributor
Bill in Mich
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-25-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

I like to turn for fun,not a great turner but some of my stuff comes out pretty nice,mostly bowls and vessels not much spindle work.

billinmich
Senior Contributor
LOman
Posts: 413
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

I like to turn as a change of pace or if I need a part for another project. Lately I've gotten into making a few pens and now the wifes Christmas order has included some of them. If I see a piece of wood that looks interesting I'll set it aside to do something with the next time I can get to the lathe. I'm not very good at it but it's fun to keep trying to get better.

Ron


"When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, "I used everything you gave me."
Frequent Contributor
Scruboak61
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎10-25-2009
0

Re: Which type of turner are you?

I'm a number 2 of group 2.  I don't have the artistic eye to make some of the hollow form vessels and bowls that some people make. Most of my turning is to make a part for a project.. Recently I've gotten into pens.  It doesn't matter what the wood is.  Each one is unique and sometimes there's a surprise inside.

Dennis Kelley Msgt (ret) ALANG
"Senior Sawdust Production Manager"

 

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