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Apprentice Contributor
JMLange6
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎08-26-2011
0

Turning tools

     I recently acquired my OWN lathe,..No more driving 20 miles one way to use Dads.....will still have to go play in his shop on occasion however,...I owe my interest and start in wood working, and many other addicting hobbies, to him :smileywink: but I can now make advancing my wood turning skills a little more affordable ,...And thanks to a few fellas on here I got the help I needed to get the proper accessories for my new toy confidently ordered and on their way!!!! ty again guys!!!

 

      Now its time to start researching some new turning tools,...The Rockwell/Delta 46-111 I got came complete with multiple tool rests, two face plates and turning tools,...I have used them a little now, and they are by far not the worst starter set I have ever seen,..But I would like to try my hand at bowl turning, and after reading through some posts on the turning forum, I'm left feeling a little under equipped,..LOL,..I would like to find a set that is good  quality, well made,..But not going to break the bank,..If I can get by, or at least get a good start with just a few basic turning tools I could maybe spend for a little better quality, and add to the collection as time goes by.  There in, however lies the question,..... WHAT DO I NEED? LOL,..I have gotten from the posts that a good bowl gouge is needed, other than that,..Bowl turning is new to me,...For that fact having to look for a turning tool some where other than the chisel rack in front of me is new, what brand and so on and so forth,...

 

     If any one cares to post turning tool brand names, web sites, required tools for this kind of turning,..Average price for either individual tool or set,...I would really appreciate your help and input :smileyhappy:

 

Jason

Senior Contributor
Joe G.
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Turning tools

[ Edited ]

If you are competent at tool sharpening, I would recommed a Thompson 1/2" v groove bowl gouge, it is pricey but is IMHO an exceptional tool. It comes unhandled, you can make your own or I would recommend buying a Bennet handle also available from a link on the same site.

 

The other tool that you will probablyneed is a thick and heavy round scraper; it will be used to smooth bumps and ridges that you willl encounter in your first few dozen bowls...I bought mine from PSI it is a Benjamines Best about 1 1/2 wide I think.

 

I still use it but most of the time I smooth with a EASY FINISHER made by easy wood tools, expensive but worth it.

Joe G
Honored Advisor
johnclucas
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Turning tools

A typical tool set that will allow you to turn most anything.

1/2" bowl gouge

3/8" detail gouge

3/4" spindle roughing gouge

3/16 or 1/4" parting tool

1" round nose scraper

3/4" flat nose scraper

1" skew

     All of the other tools I have are variations of those.     I am also a fan of the Thompson tools.  They come with a grind that is correct for many people and it's state of the art steel.   www.thompsonlathetools.com   P@N tools have a pretty good reputation for starter tools at lower prices.  I think they come from  woodcraft.

    New tools on the market that make turning a little easier for beginners, are the carbide tools from Easywoodtools or Hunter tools. 

      The Hunter Herucles is exceptional.  http://www.hunterwoodturningtool.com/     I put one in the hands a turner who has only done a few bowls and has very weak turning skills.  He turned 8" deep, 6" wide end grain hollow vessels to be put together to make a large vase.  That would have been impossible for most new turners using a bowl gouge.   they are expensive, however the cutters never (read that as can't) need sharpening.  You just rotate it to a new edge and when it eventurally gets dull just replace the cutter.

     The Easy wood tools have a lot of tools that are very easy to use.     http://www.easywoodtools.com/   They also have replaceable carbide cutters.    

     In the long run you really want to use the cutting tools I mentioned at the beginning of this.   You will get cleaner cuts and have more control of the shape.   There is a pretty good learning curve for handling and sharpening these tools.  It is worth it in the end.   The carbide tools are very expensive and you give up some control but the learning curve is almost zilch. 

 

Senior Contributor
NCPaladin
Posts: 202
Registered: ‎10-30-2009
0

Re: Turning tools

I have always had good service from Packard Tools

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/

They carry quite a few brands and are very helpful.  They carry several of the brands mentioned previously.  Their own brand is made by Hamlet and is offered in three different steel qualities.  I just purchase the standard HSS.

They do state on their web site the size, for example a UK made 3/8” is the same size as a US 1/2”.  The Britts measure across the flute and the US is measured by shaft diameter.

 

Being frugal, since you have a “set” I would just get one or two bowl gouges. 

Do you have a grinder and sharpening jig?

Do you have a quality face shield?

Senior Contributor
charliew
Posts: 460
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
0

Re: Turning tools

I have a set of the normal afore mentined turning tools including a bowl gouge. I just got one of the carbide tools and for both spindle and bowl work, it was an easy experience. I think the other tools are good now for various details. Just my two cents.

Apprentice Contributor
JMLange6
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎08-26-2011
0

Re: Turning tools

Thank you guys for all the good leads,..I have never sharpened before, but my dad has, and I have and uncle who has recently gotten into turning.  He has the jig to do them. So I'm hoping between the two of them that one of them will teach me,.... I have both a grinder and sharpening jig on the ole wish list,...Pretty sure my set needs a good sharpening,...I got sick of waiting for the 4 jaw chuck I ordered to get here, so I tried my hand at turning my first bowl using the face plate that came with the lathe,...My plan was to get the outside turned, make the tennon and wait for the chuck to do the inside,..Used a chunk of construction grade 2"x8",..Got the outside done for the most part,...Not so hot,...But could definitely be worse,...I believe what I was thinking was a roughing gouge may have been a bowl gouge,..The set has three different sizes,..I have made it through the outside of the bowl with out any thing more than a very small catch or two,....hope the inside goes as easy,..Either way it was a blast starting my first bowl!!!

 

Jason

Honored Advisor
johnclucas
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Turning tools

Check out our club site  in the tips section.  I have an article called methods of reverse chucking bowls.  You may find something that will help.  I mostly use the tailstock to hold it with a rubber sink stopper over the chuck or faceplate.  You turn away all you can and carve away the nub where the tail stock is by hand when you remove the bowl.

http://www.cumberlandwoodturners.com/htm/tips.htm

       You can tell a rough out gouge because it usually is about 3/4" wide and has a deep U shape.  Spindle gouges vary from about 3/8" to 1" and have a very flat curve on the top.  Bowl gouges vary from 1/4" to about an inch and have a deep U shape or sometimes sort of V shape.   Mostly you'll see them 3/8, 1/2 or 5/8" which makes them easily destinguishable from the roughing gouge.    It is not a good idea to use the roughing gouge on a bowl.  It's too easy to get a catch.  The same is true for a spindle gouge when doing the inside of a bowl.  If you have more than one spindle gouge you could grind the tip to about 45 or 55 degrees and then it will probably work on the inside.  If they are ground 35 degrees or so you are asking for trouble.

 

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