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Senior Contributor
william young
Posts: 463
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

[ Edited ]

Just turned this one yesterday , It was a special request by my wife . . lol . .
I sold the fruit bowl last Christmas that we had on our coffee table and she wanted it replaced . Just a basic  alternating wood  pattern  with 24 segments to every ring  except the base which is one piece . It is 11 inches wide  and 4.5 inches deep .

I asked if she wanted an oil finish or a semi gloss hard film finish or a high gloss. She chose high gloss and the customer is always right . . . . . .  right ?
The picture does not show the gloss much  because I tried with and without flash and the flash was overpowering for gloss and reflections.
She is quite pleased  with  it and says she won't let me sell this one . Said she is going to nail it down and I suggested otherwise because it would make holes in both the bowl and the coffee table.  :smileysurprised:

 

 

http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

 

Fruit Bowl.jpg

Senior Contributor
Dan Gallo
Posts: 268
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

Very nice bowl Bill. Nice to see you around again!

Dan in So.Ca.
Veteran Contributor
ric47
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

A little epoxy will keep it there on the table. LOL

Senior Advisor
Woodburner
Posts: 3,027
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

Very, very nice bowl William.

LEO
Forums Host
Veteran Advisor
rxeagle
Posts: 1,066
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

Nice bowl. Now you will have to go get the fruit too.

Gerald Lawrence @ The Eagles Nest
Brandon,MS
Senior Contributor
LOman
Posts: 413
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

Nice job William. I'm really glad to see you back turning out things.

Ron


"When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, "I used everything you gave me."
Frequent Contributor
Still Dusty Larry
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

William are you not concerned about possible problems with a solid bottom that big because of movement due to changing moisture conditions? I presume your bottom is 9 or 10 inches across made from a solid board  which can allow movement perpendicular to the grain direction. If this happens, considerable stress is put on the joints between the bottom and first ring.

Larry

Honored Advisor
johnclucas
Posts: 2,028
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

You are right Larry, that is a concern.  It depends a great deal on what wood it is and how it's cut.   I have made a fair number of segmented bowls about 6" across, 3" tall.  The bottoms were about 5" and solid.   As far as I know they are all still solid.  I know of 2 of them that are about 10 years old.  

    The movement is not as much as you might think, again depending on the species.  I have had a mirror break when the wood contractd and the 4" glass mirror didn't.   I thought I allowed enough space but that gallery was really dry apparently.  It was maple. 

     When I built my Walnut fully turned table, the top is about 14".  There is a segmented rail 2" below it seperated by spindles.   I am worried about the movement but think I took care of it.   The movement over the season is probably about 1/8" if kept inside.  That's less than I thought.  It could be more of course if the environment changes.   I used a flexible epoxy to glue the small spindles into the segmented ring and table top.  I think that will allow for the possible 1/8"

     It's always wise to consider wood movement in anything you build.   Many segmented turnings have had failures over the years.   I"ve had few and have tried to learn from them.  You can look up stats on any wood you use.  It's fairlly easy to find online.

      Bruce Hoadley's book Understanding Wood is a good read and well worth having on your shelf.

Senior Contributor
william young
Posts: 463
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

[ Edited ]

*****

William are you not concerned about possible problems with a solid bottom that big because of movement due to changing moisture conditions? I presume your bottom is 9 or 10 inches across made from a solid board  which can allow movement perpendicular to the grain direction. If this happens, considerable stress is put on the joints between the bottom and first ring.

Larry  

 

 *****

 

 

 

Actually I am not concerned at all as some are every time I post anything segmented with or without a solid bottom.

 

I used very well seasoned wood and it has several coats of  shellac as a sanding sealer  before the hard film finish is applied so exterior moisture level should not get into it and I doubt if there is enough interior moisture  in the wood to cause that problem.

The bottom board in that one is in two pieces  glued together because I did not have one wide enough  .

Of all the dozens of segmented bowls and vessels I have made I have never seen a problem with one yet. Perhaps in time  it might but I feel quite certain it won't be in my time and can only hope it doesn't later.

 

Even ones like this made some time  ago and have gone through many seasons of temperature changes  , dryness and humidity  are still in the same condition as day one. I sure got a calling down on that one and it was supposed to have totally disintegrated by now. :smileyvery-happy:   :smileywink:  :smileyhappy:

 

Maybe it is the Titebond 111 glue I use . Maybe it is just pure luck . . . dunno 

 

http://www.picturetrail.com/willyswoodcrafting

 

 

Segmentgluepractice3.jpg  

 

Segmentgluepractice1.jpg

Honored Advisor
johnclucas
Posts: 2,028
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
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Re: Basic 11" Segmented Fruit Bowl

A whole lot has to do with the size but I think more of it has to do with the environment.   I had not had any problems and made many pieces similar to what your showing.   Our club had a show in a library and sent the piece pictured.  It had an 8 segment pie in the bottom about 3 1/2" in diameter.   I got a call from one of our turners that said my piece blew up.   When I got it back the bottom had opened up.  Everything else is fine.    I replaced the bottom with a piece made out of 6 thicknesses of homemade veneer laminiated with alternating grain like plywood.  It's been sitting in my house now for 10 years and is fine.   I did screw up the bottom by trying to reshape it and cut into segments so I just keep it as a reminder to watch out for wood movement.

      I also have had some small bowls similar to the one pictured above.   They were about 6" in diameter.   I used to put solid wood on the rims.   Now I put segmented rings on tip.   The solid wood would open up little cracks in the winter and close in the summer. The segmented rims never do, at least not so far. 

     Another test I did was to make a platter about 11" in diameter.  I cut a groove and filled it with Inlace.  Then I turned away all of the groove and left an Inlace ring around the outside.   It was beautiful but I was worried about wood movement.  I kept it at home.  About 2 years later one side of the ring came loose.  The wood had shrunk and the plastic had not.   It took about 4 years for the ring to come completely off.

     so you can see why I study wood movement and try to learn from it.   No finish will stop wood from moving. It slows it down because the wood cannot absorb moisture as fast but it won't stop it.  If you store pieces in the house and you don't have the huge humidity swings we have here in Tennessee then the wood doesn't absorb as much moisture and doesn't change very much.

      Ray Allen was a master segmented turner and many of you know his work.  He has had some pieces develop cracks and have to be repaired.  Build a piece anyway you want.  It's your work and your hobby.  It may last for a year or it may last for a very long time.   I'm hedging my bets and trying to do things with  wood movement in mind so that maybe, just maybe it will last my lifetime.    Of course if I keep living this crazy lifestyle that won't be long so I don't know why I'm worried. :smileyhappy:DSC_0001.jpg

 

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