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Frequent Contributor
tod.jervey
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Homemade resaw fence

[ Edited ]

Attached are photos of a resaw fence I made for my bandsaw. It attaches to the stock fence which came on my Grizzly G0555P bandsaw.

 

I began by opening the back end of my existing fence to fill it with wood milled to fit snugly (1st photo)

end of fence showing filler blocks.jpg

 

This filler material allows attachment of threaded posts which attach the resaw jig to this fence by means of threaded brass inserts. The threaded brass inserts are inserted prior to insertion of the filler wood into the aluminum fence so that they align with holes I drilled into the top of the stock 2" extruded aluminum fence. In photo 2, note the two holes under which are the threaded brass inserts. Also note the amber epoxy which I applied to the top of the stock fence to create a single top surface to overcome the ridges along each edge.

epoxy to level original fence and mounting holes.jpg 

*Continued...

Frequent Contributor
tod.jervey
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Homemade resaw fence

The resaw jig which attaches to the stock fence needs two ranges of movement. 1: it needs to accurately adjust for vertical. 2: it needs to adjust for left and right drift.

 

The vertical adjustment is accommodated for by the use of two turnbuckles, one of which is shown in photo 3:

hardware detail.jpg

The turnbuckles are attached via bolts and right angle brackets to the fence and a horizontal U-shaped piece of 3/4" plywood. (The U-shape allows the plywood to fit around the neck of the bandsaw.) By lengthening the turnbuckles, the top of the resaw fence is adjusted closer to the blade. Shortening the turnbuckles draws the top of the resaw fence away from the blade. The base of the resaw fence is anchored to the horizontal plywood by a pair of strap hinges.

*Continued...

Frequent Contributor
tod.jervey
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Homemade resaw fence

Bandsaw drift is adjusted for by moving the resaw fence face leading or trailing edges farther away from the stock aluminum fence after loosening the two black threaded handles which screw into the threaded brass previously inserted into the top of the stock aluminum fence:

resaw fence mounted on original fence.jpg

 

The resaw jig can move away from the aluminum fence because two black threaded handles pass through slot-shaped holes bored into the horizontal U-shaped plywood:

holes adjust for drift.jpg

*Continued...

Frequent Contributor
tod.jervey
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
0

Re: Homemade resaw fence

Note: The threaded black inserts are placed equally spaced ahead of and beyond the blades cutting edge to allow other jigs to be attached. Next I will create a vertical bar to attach instead of this fence to allow guided resawing.

 

The parts list is as follows:

2 brass inserts 5/16" ID

2 handles with 5/16" threaded posts

2 strap hinges

2 turnbuckles

4 right angle brackets

4 1" bolts with locking nuts

16 1 1/2" flathead bolts with nuts and lock washers

3/4" plywood cut in U-shape, dimensions determined by fence and bandsaw

1/2" melamine laminated shelf ripped to approximately 6"

scrap wood to go inside the fence as filler

epoxy, as needed

 

The cost is approximately $40.

 

Here, at last is the installed resaw fence. Note the fence does not rest on the table surface to prevent dust buildup. Note screws pass through fence to attach hardware and are countersunk to avoid interference. When I make my next fence, I will not leave so much room under this fence: 1/8" will be enough.

resaw fence face view.jpg

Senior Contributor
Larry Doug
Posts: 922
Registered: ‎01-25-2010
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Re: Homemade resaw fence

Very nice. :smileyhappy:

Esteemed Advisor
john880
Posts: 3,999
Registered: ‎01-01-2010
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Re: Homemade resaw fence

[ Edited ]

 I am hampered by to small of a band saw to do what you can do., one of those cases that when you buy that tool, save your $$  and buy bigger. :smileysad:

 

In order to set your drift for your jig, how much material ( length into the cut) is required ether in the good material that you intend to re-saw or a sacrificial piece ?

 

In your jig, once it is set for the drift, have you had the experience where as you had to re-adjust mid cut ?

 

 Using the same blade until dull, have you found out that the drift in that blade remains the same for other types of lumber ? 












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Frequent Contributor
tod.jervey
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
0

Re: Homemade resaw fence

When I measure for drift I don't necessarily sacrifice wood. I would mark a line I want to be sawn that is parallel to an edge and cut about a foot in with no fence, pushing it only from the end into the blade and adjusting the angle to measure for drift. After carefully guiding it for about a foot, I stop leaving that piece in place against the blade and mark the straight edge of the piece on the table surface to the left of the blade. I set the drift fence to match that pencil mark. If the saw is well tuned, I notice less likelihood of drift. Now more pieces can be cut using the fence.

 

I only completed this drift fence yesterday, so no, I haven't needed to set for drift yet. This saw is new, too, and my old band saw did not adjust for drift. On the old saw I have had drift begin part way in, but I was not adjusting for drift. It is my opinion that a fence on a bandsaw does not offer the same degree of control that a table saw fence offers because the bandsaw blade is much more flexible than a circular saw blade used in a table saw.

 

New saw, new blade, so I'm not sure yet. I would expect drift to increase as any blade dulls. I keep cheap or old blades for cheap cuts and my best blade for resawing. Changing materials ought to affect drift as harder or thicker materials will increase the opportunity to flex the bandsaw blade, but tune the machine, keep its blade sharp, move the stock evenly, maintain consistent pressure with push blocks or featherboards, select good 3-4 tpi blades with deep gullets are all techniques that improve bandsaw performance.

 

Thus far, I am very happy with the resawing. This jig seems very stable. It also occurs to me that when setting the drift, I could increase stability by adding a shim between the new fence and the old. So far, that has not been needed.

 

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