Quartersawn Red Sycamore Set

by J. Kevin K on ‎10-23-2009 05:37 PM

QUARTERSAWN RED SYCAMORE SET

Posted 10/9/2009 4:31 PM CDT

It pays to pay attention at the sawmill.  Good thing my Amish friend does just that for me.  He runs the edger at the mill and sees the lumber the second it comes off the saw.  Here he had the sawyer quartersaw a sycamore log.  This log was so large that it wouldn't fit on the sawmill, so it was bigger than 4 feet in diameter. He thought it was looking good, and the sheer size of the log, made him think he could get a quality 12/4 slab out of it. He also got a 16/4 out of it as well.
 
Before it was milled though, one of the poor guys at the mill had to cut it apart with the chainsaw, lengthwise, from opposing sides.  It was a cool 85 degrees that day too, and he was cutting it under full sun.  He also hit a metal hog fence that the tree had grown around.  He sharpened up the saw, moved up the log a couple feet, and hit it again!  Sailors could have come and seen him that day to learn some new swear words.  I wish I would of got some pictures, so you guys could have seen that tortuous event, and the size of the log. 

After the milling they send the lumber to me.  The torture isn't over yet.  I have to load them in the kiln, by hand.  Sycamore is an extremely wet wood when fresh cut.  I am told that it will actually sink.  These billets went 6lbs a board foot, so they were weighing in at 150-220lbs each. Next time we won't cut 12/4, and 16/4.Can't wait for my son to put on some bulk, so he can help me out.

After trying out some of the new swear words I learned at the mill, I finally wrestled them into the kiln, where they were slowly dried for three months.  The 12/4 was then resawn into this set.  It is a collective 23+" wide by 8 feet long.  I think it turned out pretty nice.  Sometimes we resaw them, and they are full of defects on the insides, and all that work goes for nothing.  Sometimes they blow apart in the kiln, and get converted into BTU's.  This one, all the defects were on the outside for a change, and it stayed in tact.

 

S0910-18B.JPG



The black lines are spalting. The fish scale patterning is only achieved if the sycamore is quartersawn correctly.  Sycamore is a drab, uninteresting wood otherwise.

S0910-18C.jpg

 

The black lines are spalting. The fish scale patterning is only achieved if the sycamore is quartersawn correctly.  Sycamore is a drab, uninteresting wood otherwise.

 


Thank you for reading!

Kevin Koski

Dry Kiln

Owner and OperatorCurlyMapleWood.com 

www.curlymaplewood.com
The link to my homepage.

 

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All questions will be answered!

All questions will be answered!

Posted 10/9/2009 2:40 PM CDT

I will be writing a new solar kiln blog here in the next few days.  I will answer all questions from everyone in the future blogs!

Thanks everyone

Kevin

 

 

Comments
by on ‎11-13-2009 06:17 AM

Kevin, I have worked with some of your quartersawn sycamore and find it an incredible wood. A truly native exotic. Thanks for sharing this with us. Marlen  @ WOOD

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