Reply
Apprentice Contributor
thefinn1094059
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎11-29-2009
0

Granite counter top removal

Need to remove and re-use granite tops from kitchen counter cabinets. The cabinets are to be scrabbeb and the tops re-used on the new cabinets! Any tips other than do not break the granite? Thank y'all
Honored Advisor
mathisonr1
Posts: 4,071
Registered: ‎11-07-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

They should just be siliconed in place, so I would try and locate the dabs of silicone, warm them up with a hair dryer or heat gun and then drive wood shims between the countertop and the cabinet.

 

Rick

Rick Mathison
General Forums Host
"I believe that to have a friend, a man must be one."
Esteemed Advisor
71166
Posts: 2,455
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

Make sure the area by the sink cutout is very well supported as the ones I have seen installed still had the cutout secured and cut completely out after installation.   Never seen one removed.    Good Luck          Roly

Senior Advisor
GeorgeK-NJ
Posts: 1,615
Registered: ‎10-30-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

[ Edited ]

I'd even consider hiring a granite counter guy to remove and reinstall it for you. How much can that cost compared to the counter?

George K
Aberdeen, NJ

"I keep cutting and it's still to short"

"Stupid is Expensive"

Honored Advisor
mathisonr1
Posts: 4,071
Registered: ‎11-07-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal


GeorgeK-NJ wrote:

I'd even consider hiring a granite counter guy to remove and reinstall it for you. How much can that cost compared to the counter?


Very good point George.

 

Rick

Rick Mathison
General Forums Host
"I believe that to have a friend, a man must be one."
Senior Contributor
dad4taylor
Posts: 223
Registered: ‎10-27-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

Ok, I'll give this a shot:

 

First, removing a granite counter is dicey at best.  If I were a guessing man I would say that you have about a 75% chance of cracking at least one piece.  So if you're ok with that risk then go ahead but if not I would go another route.

 

Assuming you want to change the look (color, type of wood etc.) of the cabinets but are ok with the layout and interior funcionality of the cabinets already there, refacing would be your best bet.  Refacing is going to be a whole lot easier and cheaper than the job you propose.  I have very extensive experience with refacing and can tell you that once complete the cabinets will look brand new.  If you think you are skilled enough to remove a granite counter then you are skilled enough to do a reface.  You might also want to consider refinishing.  You can refinish everything including face frames and doors or you can just do the face frames and buy doors prefinished or not.  My wife wanted new kitchen cabinets under granite counters and I refinished everything for about $150 which included new door and drawer pulls as well as hinges.  They're beautiful.... if I do say so myself.  Let me know if you want to reface or refinish and I'll get you started and keep you going.

 

Assuming you still want to pull the counter here's the approach I would take:

 

First, the recip saw is your friend here.  Don't even start this unless you know what one is and can run it like a surgeon.

 

Most granite counters have at least a short backsplash that is not part of the top.  These pieces are typically 4" or so tall.  That's where I'd start.  They're most likely glued to the wall and may have a bead of silicone along their bottom edge where they meet the countertop.  Get a putty knife between the backsplash and wall and try to break that bond.  Your wall is going to be toast anyway so take as much wall as you need to along the way, that even goes as far as cutting the wall along the entirety of the top of the backsplash and removing the wallboard and backsplash at the same time.  The wallboard can be removed from the backsplash later with the backsplash face down and supported later.  Aside from the sink cutout area, the backsplash will be the second most likely area to break.

 

Now the tough part....   I install granite by screwing a 3/4" piece of ply to the tops of the cabinets to which I adhere the granite with dabs of glue.  All others do the same but I don't know how yours are installed.  Get in one of your cabinets and look up.  Is there a piece of ply there?  If yes you're ahead of the game.  There's no sense removing the granite from that ply, keep them as one forever.  The ply will help to keep the granite from bending and cracking.  The next part is going to be hard to describe so I'll give you the 10,000 foot view.  You're going to want to keep the granite from bending so it would be good if you can run stiffeners along the length of the granite and screwed to the ply underneat.  Unfortunately each cabinet has a wall that will prevent you from doing that.  The cabinet walls run perpendicular to the house wall and offer little needed support to the granite when compared to the front and rear rail which run parallel.  Cut out those walls (including the end panels) at the top of the cabinet so that you can run and attach a 2x4 on end lengthwise and about 2/3 of the way from the wall.  It's going to be tough to get one single 2 x 4 in there if one end panel can't be accessed because of a house wall but do your best.  when you come to a sink put one 2x4 in the front and one in the back to protect that small granite area from flex.  If the sink is not excessively heavy leave the sink in as it will offer some rigidity.  Once all the "strongbacks" are in place, go ahead and start cutting a section out of your vertical face frame pieces one at a time.  In place put temporary vertical members that are quick clamped in place.  Now you have the front temporarily supported but not attached to the cabinets.  Look at the back upper portion of the cabinets.  There will be a nailing plate that looks like 1x material.  That plate is nailed or screwed to the wall and the ply on top is nailed to it.  With a flashlight, look for all of the nails/screws holding the cabinets to the wall.  When you find one, make a vertical cut close to either side of the nail/screw.  Now the countertop is only secured to the strongback and temporary supports, the back pieces which are now not attached to the wall(except in those areas where a ply screw just happens to be directly above a wall screw) and the cabinets sides.  Go out now and get 100 of your closest friends and for safety (while you're in the cabinets cutting) have them support the granite while you cut the thin portion of the back wall of the cabinets free from the back nailing plate and while your in each cabinet cut the side walls about 3/4 the way up from the wall out.  Once that is complete release the front remporary supports, and pull the granite away from the wall leaving it level initially on the way out.  The idea is to pull on it away from the wall, putting the screws in shear so you can identify them.  I would imagine that thjis portion is going to be like herding cats... many people screaming, "I'm caught here", I'm bending there etc.  You should have enough people to hold the granite for a long period of time and enough people to respond to developments.  Once the granite is free move it to the vertical position so as not to break it.  With the granite free and lying face down you can go ahead and remove cabinet remants etc from the ply with little chance of breaking it.

 

Whew, that's it bud... that's how I would do it if I HAD TO but I've never been in that position....

Lead, follow, or get out of the way.
Apprentice Contributor
thefinn1094059
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎11-29-2009
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

Thank you for the tips. Refacing has been discussed and is an option. I have been thinking about pulling the cabinet of the wall, lay it on it's side and then do the "surgery" with a saws all and remove the cabinet from the granite and carefully chip away the old plywood base also. Now, as you indicate maybe I better leave the old base and mount the top to the new cabinet from under side. Sounds simple, newer tried it before but I think it is possible to do this, the wall repair behind the back splash should be simple enough!!!
Apprentice Visitor
kevinbrown890
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-03-2012
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

[ Edited ]

it is really a good idea to hire an expert for such work, with this idea we can remove it easily and reinstall it without any problem.

__________

amazing collection of Indian slate

Apprentice Visitor
adi.vol0709
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-10-2012
0

Re: Granite counter top removal

[ Edited ]

I agree with kevin granite counter top removal is not an easy task, It certainly need good proffesional skill to do it right, so it's better to hire an expert.

 

 

 

Get granite paving slabs

 

© Copyright 2009, Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Service.