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Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,393
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Terry..  A warm welcome to the WOOD Forums and thank you for your great reply.

 

I think I agree that I would rather replace than repair, but I do have a question regarding your fix:

 

Would it have been easier just to replace the whole door jamb assembly and outside brick molding, rather than jus do part of it?

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Senior Contributor
CloseEnuff
Posts: 285
Registered: ‎10-25-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Larry,

You are dealing with your problem early in the rotting stages that a door typically goes through.  As Matt intially stated, ensure you get all the rotten stuff out and find good wood to build on.   I was asked by my MIL to replace her garage entry door in the back of their house last August.  It had a dryer vent hole cut into it and she was tired of it (30+ years with a hole in the door).   "Sure" I said, but what's that dusty stuff on the concrete below the door jamb?  Before long I had 4' of sheetrock and the entire door and jamb removed.  One door jamb was about 70% gone.  It just fell apart.  Oh and there was substandard electrical and water for the washer next to the door that I had to totally replace.  And this wall was inside the brick exterior - what a PITA!  And the sill plate was totally gone, nails hanging from the wall studs where the sill plate was.  I even had to pour some concrete to get the sub structure all level again.  What a mess.  It was 3 days before I actually got to hang the new door.  But I was on vacation and it was fun to fix this hidden problem.  The termites were long gone.  But they had never taken care of the repair work.  Which I can't believe people put up with.  So good for you, taking care of this now.  Suggest you build something overhead to protect the door from the water.

Pray For our Country and Leadership - which is currently non-existent

Apprentice Visitor
Tskeeter
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Not really.  By replacing the jamb and trim on only one side of the door I probably reduced the time by half.  (The problem was the latch side of the door, so I didn't even take off the door.  Swung it open and went to work.  No squaring and plumbing a new jamb, etc.  Just make sure the gap on the latch side of the door was even from top to bottom and consistent with the rest of the door.)  I was selling the house, so was looking for a cheap, easy way to do the job.  On the other hand, it might be a lot less time consuming for you to find a complete jamb kit than to find just one piece of the jamb assembly.  I was just fortunate that I knew I had a lumber yard than stocked a wide variety of mill work within a few miles.

 

Another approach would be to build up a jamb, rather than buying a pre-milled one.  Since I was trying to match existing work, and had only a limited inventory of tools and equipment to work with, I went the pre-milled route.   

Senior Advisor
firejohn
Posts: 2,184
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

After you go through the effort to repair or replace the rotten areas, I would install a storm door to protect it.

Senior Contributor
DRAGON1
Posts: 414
Registered: ‎11-03-2009

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Yank it all out.

 

While bondo or rot fix will fill the hole it doesn't fix the wet rotting wood UNDER the surface.

 

And while your at it you need to fix the original cause of rotting in that corner which is splashing water from either

 

No gutters or leaking corner

 

No splash channel on top so when the water comes down the valley there it doesn't shoot past the gutter and splash/drip down.

 

That being said, it also pays to pull it out so you can check insulation and sheathing to make sure it hasn't been damaged inside the walls or is still wet.

Of course I don't look busy!!!

I did it right the first time!!!!
Esteemed Advisor
71166
Posts: 2,433
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

 I agree with Dragon,  If the wood is rotten just replace it, at least that side.   I would think trying to clean it all out and stabilize it would be more work and expense than replacing.  Then I would think it would only last a few years if that.    With your skills you won't have any problem making one.   You will need a bigger quarter though.:smileyvery-happy:     Roly

Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,393
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

[ Edited ]

Dragon..  I agree with you.  Now, would you be willing to give ole Dad a step-by-step?  Would be ever grateful and might even share some ales with you some day.  :smileyhappy:

 

Roly..  The Model Shop project is done, all but taking the final five images and posting them here either tomorrow or Saturday.

 

Then I can mail back the 7" quarter that Leo sent me..  :smileyvery-happy:

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Senior Contributor
DRAGON1
Posts: 414
Registered: ‎11-03-2009

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Ok, here we go.

 

Hammer, crowbar, Bondo, fresh caulk, finish nails, screwgun, trim bar, sawzall and 1 ft blade for nails and wood, shims, new door, utility knife. 3-inch screws and a new Door same measurements as the old one. Plastic and staplegun optional if wood is wet and needs to dry or opening needs other work and needs to be closed off. .

 1) Remove old door by pulling hinge pins and remove

2) Pull exterior trim off outer edge of door  (called brick molding) all the way around, It's the last wood next to the J trim and siding.

3) Pull inside door trim from door by using the Utility knife and cutting the paint between the wall and outside edges of the trim.  Then use the trim bar and work the trim away from the wall slowly and put aside.

You should be able to see the space between the house framing and the doorjamb with the shims in it.

4) Run the sawzall blade in this space all the way around the door, effectively separating jamb from framing.

5) Remove or pound in any nails, screws etc. sticking out.

6) Check framing for damage (water, bugs, etc.) and check doorsill.  Replace damage as necessary.

7) Leaving belt around door, slide door into place.  Make sure door is plumb, square and level, adjust with shims, screw door into jamb above and below shim placements preferably hiding screws behind a insulation grooves or countersunk holes.

8) Stuff gaps between doorframe and house frame with some loose insulation.

9) Replace Interior trim and then replace exterior trim making sure to caulk behind and around  brickface molding, especially above door.   Use bondo to fill holes on exterior and interior.  Sand, prime and paint.

 

Other than that, it’s pretty simple but start early just in case you need to go to the store for something ( a new Door sill or back doorbell?)

Of course I don't look busy!!!

I did it right the first time!!!!
Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,393
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Well done, Mike.

 

Actually the hinge side of the door is OK,  The rotted side is the latch side.  Terry mentioned only replacing that side, which makes sense to me.  About the same procedures?

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Senior Contributor
DRAGON1
Posts: 414
Registered: ‎11-03-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Sure but you'll find it a little harder to do as plumb and square take on a whole stronger meaning because now it must be aligned with a door that's already hung.

 

Might I suggest you take out any insulation the old door used and reuse it in the new side?

 

And since your doing only one side, a few 1/4 inch lags countersunk above and below the lockset might be in order here.  ( be sure to shim well to keep from moving wood when you tighten them.)

 

You'll find it tougher than installing a new door but cheaper, lol.

 

Let me know if you need anything else.

Of course I don't look busy!!!

I did it right the first time!!!!

 

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