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Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,437
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Exterior door frame repair

The door frame around our back door is rotted out on the bottom.  See three images below.

 

Would some one please walk me through the repair/replacement?  Step-by-step instructions would be most appreciated.

 

Thanks!

 

Larry

 

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100_0743A.JPG

 

100_0742A.JPG

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Community Manager
MSWOODcraft
Posts: 5,368
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Step 1:

chop out all punky wood so that nothing but solid reliable wood remains.

 

Step 2.  Make a hard plastic squeegee conformed to the exact molding profile as the wood that you're replacing. 

 

Step 3.  Buy and then mix per directions System 3's SCULPWOOD product.

 

Step 4.  Hammer in several nails into the substructure which will be below the finished surface.  These pins will be structual bones hidden inside the patch for the epoxy wood to grab ahold of, be molded around, and which will prevent the patch from being kicked out or shift around.

 

Step 5.  Slather in plenty of the mixed up epoxy and build up to beyond the intended thickness and dimensions.

 

Step 6.  Use your precut plastic trowel/squeegee and tool the wood's profile into the Sculpwood.   Don't worry about voids or bubbles or things like that.  You can come in with a second application to fill those.   Get the lion's share of the profile tooled into the wood epoxy during the first go.


Step 7. Wait until dry


Step 8.  Hit with a little #220 paper to round over edges and make the area look as distressed as the surrounding areas.  This prevents the new patch from jumping out at you as being a new patch.  Fill surface imperfections with more Sculpwood if required.

 

Step 9 and 10:  prime and paint.

 

And YES, I have done this exact protocol on my own house and for a few clients.  It works.

Best,

Matt Seiler
Wood Online Moderator

Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,437
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Wow!

 

Thanks so much, Matt.  I really thought I would get all "replace" responses.  Did you use the "Rot Fix" they mention in the Amazon ad?

 

About how long does the repair last?

 

Thanks again..

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Senior Contributor
Larry Doug
Posts: 923
Registered: ‎01-25-2010
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Re: Exterior door frame repair

I had no idea they made such a product. If I may add to what Matt said, I would try to eliminate the source of moisture that caused this problem. :smileyhappy:

Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,437
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Larry..

 

As you can see in one of the images, the door does sit in a corner, so rain does find it's way there.

 

The real cause is that when they built our house in 1995, they used plain wood door frames and not the treated ones, and I wasn't smart enough to look either when they were building the house. 

 

The front door frame is still very good, but there is a roof over the doorway.

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Community Manager
MSWOODcraft
Posts: 5,368
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Exterior door frame repair

[ Edited ]

I've never used RotFix.  It probably wouldn't hurt, but I have no mileage with the stuff.  For the repairs that I've made I've just mixed up the epoxy and spent time getting it in and on the area to be patched.

 

I first encounted this when I was working on a tornado damage restoration job in a historic part of a neighboring town.  I had to use it to reproduce damaged areas on an old Victorian 'painted lady''s exterior trim.  It was seriously easier than ripping out and then trying to duplicate an 1880's molding profile.   The client loved that we didn't have to rip anything out and it won good feelings during the process.

 

That was the better part of a decade ago and as far as I know the patch is still in play and is still doing its job.  Since that time I've used it on my own home to good effect.

Best,

Matt Seiler
Wood Online Moderator

Community Manager
MSWOODcraft
Posts: 5,368
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

[ Edited ]

Separately, and for what it's worth:  when I need to make a custom sanding block that's conformed to a goofy profile I use Sculpwood.   I lay down a piece of saran wrap, apply some of the goo and walk away.   The plastic wrap acts as a release agent/barrier with practically zero thickness.

 

When it's dry I have a negative impression of the piece that needs sanding.   That gets used as a sanding block and I'm off to the races.   Sculpwood is good stuff.

Best,

Matt Seiler
Wood Online Moderator

Esteemed Advisor
Larry-Jenkins
Posts: 3,437
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Thanks again, Matt..

 

Body putty (Bondo) makes a great negative profile for sanding.  I made them when I used to restore Model A Fords using your same methods.

 

Great idea.

 

Larry

Larry.. East Central Iowa

Good enough.. Isn't.
Community Manager
MSWOODcraft
Posts: 5,368
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

OOops - forgot to mention one optional step.

 

To reduce the amount of epoxy goo you need it's fair to insert blocking on the inside of the chopped out area to take up mass and create the need for less epoxy goo.   Totally discretional, the amount, size and shape totally up to you.  If you elect to go this route, make sure it's nailed/screwed robustly to the substructure and then hammer in your 'bones' nails.

 

You could block all but the last quarter inch or so and then only mix up enough epoxy to get you that last bit of the way towards a finished profile.    Utterly up to you.

Best,

Matt Seiler
Wood Online Moderator

Apprentice Visitor
Tskeeter
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-15-2011
0

Re: Exterior door frame repair

Larry, when I had the same issue I followed a version of the replace route.  I replaced the rotted side of the door jamb and the brick mold trim.  I found the side of the door jamb and the brick mold at a lumber yard that sold a lot of mill work.  To make the repair I removed the interior trim on one side and across the top of the door as well as the rotted brick mold on the outside of the door.  I found that the side piece of the brick mold was pinned to the top piece with a finish nail driven in from the top.  After pulling off the side piece, I clipped off the exposed end of the nail with a side cutter.  I used a hack saw blade (a sawsall would be easier) to cut off the nails holding the side of the door jamb to the framing of the door opening and removed the shims that aligned the side of door jamb.  After prying the side of the door jamb away from the top of the jamb a bit, I was able to cut the staples that hold the top of the door jamb to the side of the jamb.  Once the rotted jamb and trim were out of the way, I installed and shimmed the new side of the door jamb, installed the trim and reinstalled the door hardware.  To anchor the top of the new door jamb piece, where I had cut the staples, I glued the joint and used a couple of small finish nails to hold things in place until the glue dried.  Since there wasn't room to use a hammer to drive the finish nails into place, I started the nails, then used a nail set to drive them home.  To prevent moisture from wicking up into the new jamb and brick mold and rotting them out again, I painted the end grain of the new jamb and brick mold before I installed them. 

 

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