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Senior Contributor
dbgessner
Posts: 178
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
0

Dry rot cure or not?

I'm constantly seeing wood rot way before it's time here in Central Texas.

 

I've replaced trim pieces on rather new homes because the heat and whatever else just kills it.

 

Now, I'm looking at my garage door jamb and see it's rotted up to about the one foot level.  No, it isn't in contact with the ground.  No, there are no gutters.  Yes, it's already hit 90 degrees in the last week!

 

So, when I replace the boards, is there any harm in smoothing a coat of silicon caulk on the end grain?  It seems that would prevent wicking.  I could just prime and paint, but I would like a solution that lasts.

 

David

Advisor
2Chessies
Posts: 780
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

You could smear a thin coat of caulk on the end grain,and it will help for a while.The problem,regardless of geographic location, is wood will rot.If I were you,and this is an ongoing issue in your house as well as others,I would check inot a good liquid preservative.I can't remember the name of one we used when I was building a water cooling tower for a chemical plant.We used CCA treated wood for it but we still had to paint it on the end grain of every board we cut. Your other option would be to replace it with a similar sized piece of PVC material if you can find one in that size. You didn't say how old your door jamb is so even replacing it with a rot resistant wood,like cedar or redwood may be another option you can look into.

Senior Contributor
CloseEnuff
Posts: 285
Registered: ‎10-25-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

I have observed 'new homes' in the Houston area that are about 10 years old or younger being built with exterior trim made from pine and fir.  And it looks like crap as the stuff rots.  Of course they paint it right away to hide that fact.  I submit that you are likely dealing with the same issue.  I would use pressure treated anything near the ground.  But make sure it is dry before you paint it.  Some of that wood is dripping wet when you pull it off the pile.

Pray For our Country and Leadership - which is currently non-existent

Honored Advisor
amateur60
Posts: 1,661
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

Why not cellular PVC trim, such as Kleer?  Doesn't rot or absorb moisture.  Does expand lengthwise with heat, so there are specific installation instructions to follow.  White doesn't need painting.  It can be painted and is supposed to hold paint very well--because of no moisture issues. 

Senior Contributor
dad4taylor
Posts: 223
Registered: ‎10-27-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

New homes use the lowest possible grade material they can get away with.  All the sub divisions in my area look just dandy when they're brand new but ten years later look like a theme park that's about to go out of business... people fall for the decorative stuff... an arbor or bracket out front is beautiful until you have to paint it.  And then even if you have the gumtion to do it your neighbor won't.

 

Having said that there's surely a reason that jamb is rotted and assuming there was a good coat of paint on there the sun should not have done that.  I think you have a water issue that I would address first. 

 

You say the house doesn't have gutters and that issue should be solved immediately.  Gutters are hugely important.

 

Since you have to repair the area anyway I would scab in some sort of material that won't rot such as Azek or hardiplank. 

Lead, follow, or get out of the way.
Senior Contributor
dbgessner
Posts: 178
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

Guess what?  The trim pieces in PVC look good and would last.... wish they'd make the whole jamb out of that material, yet I couldn't find a replacement jamb at Home Depot.  All jambs sold with door as part of the price.  They would sell a door without a jamb, but no jamb without a door.  Weird.

 

I'll probably end up milling my jamb and be done with it.  This time, I'll make sure the primer and paint are done right.  That rotted jamb looks to have one light coat of paint and that's it.

Honored Advisor
amateur60
Posts: 1,661
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

The PVC cuts and mills like wood.  Doesn't have the structural strength if the jambs are structural and not basically trim. 

Senior Contributor
dad4taylor
Posts: 223
Registered: ‎10-27-2009
0

Re: Dry rot cure or not?

If the house is new then that couldbe your issue... only one light coat of paint.  See it here all the time.  You can make a good living just replacing wood on 10 year old homes here...

 

Jamb material should be available at your local lumber yard pretty readily.

Lead, follow, or get out of the way.

 

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