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Senior Contributor
TexasWally
Posts: 538
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Using Titebond III

I will be using Titebond III for the first time. Is there anything I should do differently from when I use the original Titebond? TIA

Wally

My other hobby is napping. Fun and inexpensive!
Veteran Advisor
Allen Worsham
Posts: 1,092
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
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Re: Using Titebond III

I use the TB III a lot. Being that it is the more water resistant than the other TB glues, it is best to be used for outdoor projects or projects that will come into contact with moisture, like cutting boards, which I make a lot of. You can use the TB III for any wood project and not just exterior. One good thing about the TB III is that it has a longer open time than than TB I or II, which is great when you have to glue up a number of pieces that you need to tweak as you put on the clamps. It also cleans up easier with water than TB I or TB II since it doesn't cure as quickly. One complaint that I have heard from some is that when gluing lighter wood together, like maple, the glue line is more visible since the TB III is more of a brownish color as opposed to being more yellow like the TB I or II. But I have not personally had any problems with it and I use lots of maple.

 

The TB III will be a bit more expensive than TB I or II, but not so much that it will make a big difference. One thing to consider when you buy it is how long it has been on the shelf in the store. While Home Depot and Lowes both carry all 3 of the TB glues in the pint bottles, the TB III is the least popular so it will tend to remain on the shelf longer. Check to see if there is any seperation in the glue (two tone) and if you see that, look for another one. I have found that it is better for me to buy my glue at my local Rockler store as their stock is rotated much more regularly than Home Depot or Lowes.

Allen Worsham, Corona, CA

allenworsham@gmail.com





"Graze in every man's field, but always give your own milk."

J.V. McGee
Honored Advisor
kmealy
Posts: 2,194
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

[ Edited ]

 

 

From Titebond's web site:

 

How to decode the date of manufacture:

"The first number is the final digit, of the year in which the glue was produced. So 8 would be 2008, 9-2009...

The following letter represents the month in which the glue was produced.
A=January B=February...  "I" isn't used, as it can be confused with the number one.

You can ignore the remainder of the code.

Liquid Hide Glue has a non-encoded date as it has a shorter shelf life."

 

and

 

 

"Our literature states the shelf life of all of our glues as one year. Titebond Liquid Hide Glue includes an expiration date on the bottle, because it can progressively lose its ability to dry hard, and this change is not visually obvious. Titebond Polyurethane Glue has a one year shelf life in an unopened container, but is usable as long as the glue remains fluid. Polyurethanes, however, are designed to react when exposed to moisture and can sometimes begin to cure after the bottle has been opened, and solidify.

Most of our yellow and white glues, including Titebond Original and Titebond II, remain usable beyond two years. Should Titebond Original become thick and stringy, or Titebond II turns into an orange colored gel, these changes signify that the glue is no longer usable. The minimum shelf life of Titebond III is stated as one year, when stored appropriately at room temperature. Titebond III is expected to last beyond its stated shelf life. If thickened, shake vigorously by firmly tapping bottle on a hard surface until product is restored to original form."

 

 

 

Just as a side note, I attended a Marc Adams seminar this spring.   He was a beta tester of TB  II (if I remember correctly).   His instructions were, "Apply like you would any PVA glue."    He said his response was that he never actually had much instruction in how to apply any PVA glue and asked for some written instructions.   Franklin finally said they found something and he asked them to fax it to him.   They said, no, we will send you a copy.   Arriving a few days later was a 2000 page book on how to use glues.  (!)

 

One of Marc's comments was don't be in a big rush to join the glued surfaces together.   Letting the glue sit open for a minute actually helps the process along.

Senior Contributor
Frank Rothmann
Posts: 190
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

All great advice & information. However,

My peeve is: why cannot manufacturers just use the actual manufacture date that everyone can decipher without "inside information"?

Probably Elmer's (Borden) or Gorilla Glue  uses a different method of date-coding from Titebond's.

Even tool mfgrs use varying systems.

Frank in Anderson, SC

Why is there enough time to do it over, but not enough time to do it right the first time?
Esteemed Advisor
p_toad
Posts: 3,482
Registered: ‎12-31-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

Frank,

 

If they used a real normal readable date, then you, and I, and everyone else who really cared about getting that freshest package that would last us longest (unless we expected to use it up in a week), would simply dig through their stock for the most current production and leave all the old (possibly stale) merchandise sitting on the shelf where it would gather dust.  If you don't see a "readable" date, you're just as likely to buy one that looks good to your eye (not off color, etc.) and you might not know that it's been sitting there a year on their shelf.

Advisor
JohnModi
Posts: 670
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

The only thing I will add it that it is important to clean it off the clamp bars as soon as you wipe off the squeeze out. If you let it drip on the bars and dry, it can be a bear to get off.

 

 

Advisor
Marlen_at_WOOD
Posts: 482
Registered: ‎10-20-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

John, as per your reply:

The only thing I will add it that it is important to clean it off the clamp bars as soon as you wipe off the squeeze out. If you let it drip on the bars and dry, it can be a bear to get off. John

 

I just wanted to let you and others know we just added a Clamping Tips Slide show at WOOD Online. We have several more of these tip slide shows going live in the next few months, so stay tuned.

 

Marlen @ WOOD

Veteran Advisor
Allen Worsham
Posts: 1,092
Registered: ‎10-22-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

To add in a tip when using clamps during glue up. I use clear packing tape and cover the area of the clamp bar when doing glue ups. The glue will not stick to the packing tape and the paking tape typically comes off pretty easy. I will pinch the tape to the edge and about 3/4 of the way down so that I have the edge of the tape accessible to remove the tape when done. I also wrap all of my cauls on all 4 sides and ends with clear packing tape. Since the glue won't stick to the packing tape, it doesn't stick to the cauls. I keep a tray with all different sizes of cauls so I always have them handy. If I need a specifc size I just cut up some scrap wood and wrap them with tape.

Allen Worsham, Corona, CA

allenworsham@gmail.com





"Graze in every man's field, but always give your own milk."

J.V. McGee
Veteran Advisor
rxeagle
Posts: 1,175
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Using Titebond III

 


Allen Worsham wrote:

To add in a tip when using clamps during glue up. I use clear packing tape and cover the area of the clamp bar when doing glue ups. The glue will not stick to the packing tape and the paking tape typically comes off pretty easy. I will pinch the tape to the edge and about 3/4 of the way down so that I have the edge of the tape accessible to remove the tape when done. I also wrap all of my cauls on all 4 sides and ends with clear packing tape. Since the glue won't stick to the packing tape, it doesn't stick to the cauls. I keep a tray with all different sizes of cauls so I always have them handy. If I need a specifc size I just cut up some scrap wood and wrap them with tape.


To add to this Allen I wax my cauls and use saran on bar clamps (easier to remove than tape).

 

Gerald Lawrence @ The Eagles Nest
Brandon,MS
Honored Advisor
stick48668
Posts: 11,549
Registered: ‎01-15-2010
0

Re: Using Titebond III

give wax paper or "Saran Wrap" a try...


this would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
if only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....

 

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