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Apprentice Contributor
lorienhome
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-07-2011
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Repairing pre-finished hardwood

I could really use some help. How do you repair badly scratched pre-finished hardwood flooring? It's 3 1/2 inch planking, very light colored birch and the unused box  is marked "satin". That applies, I assume to either the wood color or the urethane finishing. In the last year of our pets life, she was really hard of the floors and we didn't have the heart to cordon her in another area of the house.

   Thank you,

     Lynne

Frequent Contributor
taylor3038
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎12-07-2010
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Re: Repairing pre-finished hardwood

Lynne,

 

I'm sure the "satin" refers to the finish. If it's a polyurethane finish they are very difficult to repair from what I've heard. First there are some questions that will help everyone try to help you with this issue.

 

1. Is the floor solid wood or a laminate?

2. How deep is the damage? Is it just the finish or is the wood scratched and gouged?

3. Do you know what the original finish is? Manufacturer and product name.

Kevin

"There are two things that are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the universe." Albert Einstein
Honored Advisor
kmealy
Posts: 2,180
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
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Re: Repairing pre-finished hardwood

It may be worse than that.   It could be a two-component finish that might be impossible to recoat or repair.   Best to follow up with the manufacturer for their recommendations.   Just scuff sanding and "slapping on a coat of poly" could end up with it peeling like a bad sunburn.

Apprentice Contributor
lorienhome
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-07-2011
0

Re: Repairing pre-finished hardwood

Hi Kevin,

   The box the wood came in reads

   "Solid Birch/ 3 1/4"  /Select or Better /Satin

   I agree. The 'satin' reflects the shine of the finish.  I am getting the feeling that there is no recipe for fixing pre-finished flooring. I can't tell you how much I was hoping there was.

   Our 4 legged family member surface scratched the floor and gouged it. If it is possible to refinish the floor, repeated light coats or spot filling with verathane or urethane or polyurethane would be needed to fill the deeper ones. I have more questions than I have answers.

   I have the manufactures name but, I pretty sure they will just recommend new flooring and I would prefer not to go that route.

   Lynne

Apprentice Contributor
lorienhome
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-07-2011
0

Re: Repairing pre-finished hardwood

There has to be a way. Lurking under the scratched finish is beautiful birch wood. There has to be a way to neutralize the manufacturer's finish (sanding/ interim coat of something ) that will allow subsequent thin coats of urethane/verathane/polyurethane to adhere.  Or not.  Is polyurethane a combination of urethane and verathane?

More questions than answers!

Lynne

Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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I understand your decision…

Lynne;

 

…to allow your aging pet to have access to all of the areas of your home.  However, there are some things that just can’t be fixed.  The finish on pre-finished flooring is generally among them.  In the first placed, you may be assured that the finish is not polyurethane or any of its namesake DIY derivatives.  Polyoneverythane, largely through marketing, has become the only solution to every clear finish need that today’s consumer will find in retail outlets from the corner hardware store to the large big-box home centers.  But the reality, as KMealy has already suggested, is that the stuff exhibits incredibly poor adhesion properties when applied to anything other than bare wood.  Even thorough sanding to create a mechanical bond will not allow poly to properly grip your pre-finished floor and it will soon loose adhesion.  (Poly aside, other varnish types with superior adhesion properties will not work in this application either.) Unfortunately, there is no simple solution to your problem, and any solution that does exist will likely begin with the manufacturer of your flooring backed up by the manufacturer’s referral to a competent local flooring contractor familiar with the refinishing process for your floor. 

 

Your questions actually distil down to one; can the floor be refinished?  The answer to the question begins with a call to the manufacturer…

 

Steve

Finishing & Refinishing Forum Host
Honored Advisor
kmealy
Posts: 2,180
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0

Re: I understand your decision…

  as a follow-up / summary of my prior post:   Some of this finish is resistant to anything else sticking to it, including itself after a specific re-coat window (generally a few hours).

Honored Advisor
stick48668
Posts: 11,514
Registered: ‎01-15-2010
0

Re: Repairing pre-finished hardwood

A lot of the prefinished floor manufactures have scratch repair kits...

 

that may be worth looking into...



this would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
if only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Apprentice Contributor
lorienhome
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-07-2011
0

Re: I understand your decision…

Thanks Steve,

    You're right. I will give the manufacturer a call tomorrow and see what they say and take it from there. I am familiar with projects and furniture I have made myself and how to correct any finish blemishes that occur over time. This is way out of my level of expertise.  Still holding on to hope that they will tell me there is a way to fix the floor. Having said that.....really doubt it.

    Will keep you posted.

Lynne

Apprentice Contributor
lorienhome
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-07-2011
0

Re: I understand your decision…

Hi Steve,

    Followed the advice from the pros on this site and contacted the manufacturer and also went into Home Despot (well, they do have a corner on the market!), where we bought the flooring, and both places agreed on the method of fixing the floor. It won't be easy. Sand down to the bare wood and recoat with at least 3 coats of polyurethane. The gouges can be filled with filler that hardens. May be difficult to match the color of the filler so it will be trial and error. Staining is optional, but I think I will. Even though it is a natural color now, I think a very light stain will give the floor an even look. This is going to be a huge project. One site I visited mentioned something about a "screen" for removing the layers of urethane. Ever heard of this? I'm familiar with using a sander, but I did not think there was an alternative. Also, where  a sander will work on the flat surfaces, how do you get into the bevelled sides?

    Wow, this is going to be huge!

  Lynne

 

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