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Jay In Atlanta
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-29-2009
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Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

My neighbor has asked my advice about repairing the finish on a Stickley night stand because “Jay knows everything about wood”.  I’m flattered but far from an expert, particularly when it comes to refinishing.

 

It’s a nice piece, made of cherry, and only the top needs work.  There are two bad water stains, one from a drink glass and a larger one, probably the result of moisture under an appliance.

 

The neighbor has already tried the Formby’s route (twice) and says it improved the appearance somewhat but not nearly enough.  There is very little, if any topcoat left.

 

As far as I can see, sanding down to bare wood and finishing from scratch is the option left but the reason for this post is to see if any of you with a lot of experience in this area can suggest a less drastic

solution.

 

 

.

Honored Advisor
kmealy
Posts: 2,124
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
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Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

Formby's has a number of products, but I assume from the results he has used the Conditioning Furniture Refinisher or Paint & Poly remover.  Both of these are stripper products, that is why "most of the finish is gone"

 

It's hard to say what the stain(s) are from, but I would start with a light sanding.   If that fails, I'd probably go  with an A-B wood bleach.  Either method is going to remove some of the accumulated patina of cherry wood, so it's going to be lighter for a while until the suntan catches up.

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Jay In Atlanta
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-29-2009
0

Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

Yes, I have already warned him about the lighter bare wood.  I have had some success with a laquer/stain application that gets closer to the current patina.

Honored Advisor
ynoT
Posts: 10,603
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

Jay,

 

Be careful of bringing the top to curent color.

Once the top matures again, it will darken again, and it might be, then, too dark from the rest of the table.

 

Is top removable?

 

Tony

"Why worry about things you can't control when you can keep yourself busy controlling the things that depend on you."
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Jay In Atlanta
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-29-2009
0

Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

Yep, the top can be removed - six tabletop fasteners accessible with a stubby screwdriver.

Honored Advisor
ynoT
Posts: 10,603
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

I'm thinking here....

 

I would remove the top and strip it, not sanding.

Hardly any loss of patina and it may come out just as good.

 

If any sanding done it would be a very light one by hand, after striping and washing down the residue.

 

Tony

"Why worry about things you can't control when you can keep yourself busy controlling the things that depend on you."
Honored Advisor
amateur60
Posts: 1,646
Registered: ‎10-24-2009

Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

By the way, this is a Stickley night stand only in the sense that it was made by the L.G. & A Stickley Co., but it isn't of the Craftsman style that Sticckley set fashions with their (and more importantly, Gustav's) earlier products.  It's a "traditional" style from a respectable factory. 

Honored Advisor
Howard Acheson
Posts: 1,153
Registered: ‎10-24-2009

Re: Refinishing a Stickley Night Stand

I too, would recommend removing the top and using a chemical paint stripper containing methylene chloride.  Follow the directions on the label.  A chemical paint stripper will not remove much or any of the patina. 

 

To remove water stains, the bleach to use is oxalic acid.  Any good paint store should have it.  Oxalic acid is the bleach to remove water and mineral stains.  You may have to apply multiple times.

 

Do not use a two part A/B bleach.  That bleach is used to remove the natural color of the wood.  That's not what you should want to do.

 

Once you have the stains removed or greatly reduced. sand very lightly (or you will remove the patina), vacuum off the dust and apply a coat of oil based non-poly varnish.  Let it dry and flat sand the surface with 320 paper mounted on a felt or rubber surfaced sanding pad.  Then apply a couple of more coats of varnish.  My recommendation for varnish is to use Waterlox Original.  It looks particularly nice on dark colored woods and is one of the most water and water vapor resistant finishes.

Howie..............

 

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