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jfisher25713
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎05-20-2013
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Pratt and Lambert Varmor Clear Urethane Satin R11

Hello:

 

I am looking to find some Pratt and Lambert Varmor Clear Urethane Satin R11.  I understand that they have discontinued it.  Does anyone know where I can buy some and or a replacement that keeps the light look.  

Thanks

Jerry

Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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Welcome…

Jerry;

 

…to the WOOD Magazine Forums, particularly to the Finishing & Refinishing Forum. I hope you will visit often. You will find a number of accomplished woodworkers and finishers here who stand ready to assist you with your finishing and refinishing questions.

 

R11 is (was) simply Polyoneverythane, there is nothing particularly unique about the product.  Any satin Polyoneverythane will look pretty much the same.  If you are looking for a truly clear varnish finish that will not yellow then you may want to look in the Pratt & Lambert #38.  It is an alkyd resin (as opposed to urethane resin) varnish made from soya (soybean) oil.  It goes on much lighter (clearer) and does not yellow over time.  It is also harder and much easier to repair should the need ever arise…

 

Steve

Finishing & Refinishing Forum Host
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hankm
Posts: 2,040
Registered: ‎11-07-2010
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Re: Pratt and Lambert Varmor Clear Urethane Satin R11

Welcome to the forums of Woodmagazine.com, Jerry. I'd also like to invite you to explore the video channels as well.

 

WOOD Online has a very respectable library of free videos for your education and enjoyment in the pursuit of learning more about the craft of woodworking.

 

There are two channels you can look at for specific subjects:

 

The first is WOODCuts.

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodvision/

This is the site to go for “house” videos that WOOD magazine has produced for its site visitors. Although these may have commercials in them, and thus have a bit of a loading wait, they are still solid blocks of good to know information professionally shot and edited, with clear and concise demonstrations.

 

The second resource for videos is WOODTube.

http://woodtube.ning.com/

These are user submitted videos usually shot by woodworkers who wish to visually share tips, tricks, and techniques they feel are worth passing on. This site has a search engine so you can get more specific in your need to know area.

 

And finally, don't forget you can use the site search function, located at the top of the forum pages to bring up past articles of interest too!

A successful journey has two parts; facing the right direction, and taking the first step.




- Beachside Hank, WOOD Online Video Host

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stick48668
Posts: 10,832
Registered: ‎01-15-2010
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Re: Pratt and Lambert Varmor Clear Urethane Satin R11

 

Jerry, welcome to the forums… Glad you're here... Pull up a seat and make yourself to home...

(the gladiators and lions will be along shortly without warning and under separate cover)...

 

 

 

There is a tremendous amount of information, help and technique contained in here in these following links just for the asking...

 

 

 

General Woodworking

 

Tools and Tool Buying

 

Info Sharing

 

Finishing and Refinishing

 

Shop Setup and Design

 

Wood Turning

 

Home Improvements

 

Woodworking Software

 

Top Shop Tips

 

Free Classifieds

 



 

Feel like some socializing??? By all means, jump right in to the Off Topic forum...

 



 

Whatever your likes that may be, they are/will be generously covered there...

 

So explore to your heart's content...

 

Here are even more links for answers and geared to inspire...

 

 

 

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/

 

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/

 

http://www.woodstore.net/

 

http://www.woodmagazine.com/promotions/free-production-information/

 

http://www.woodmag

 

http://woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/

 

http://www.woodmagazine.com/photos/

 



 

Need still even more ideas ya say??? Have a look see right here at the PHOTO GALLERYpages...

 

 

 



this would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
if only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Contributor
jfisher25713
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎05-20-2013
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Re: Welcome…

Thank you very much.  I had not realized that.  This will be of great help. So appreciate you taking the time.  Best regards

Jerry

Contributor
jfisher25713
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎05-20-2013
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Re: Welcome…

I was just taking with Pratt and Lambert and they said because Pratt & Lambert #38. is a resin I should not apply it over the wood where I have the Pratt and Lambert Clear Urethane 11.  In checking around futurer I called Waterlox and it appears that Waterlox Satin XL89 Urethane would be able to be applyed over the Pratt and Lambert Clear Urethane satin R11 .  In reading the reviews it appears that the Waterlox Satin XL89 Urethane is close and perhaps even superior substitute for the discontinued Pratt and Lambert r11, and would give me a light applicattion that would not yellow over time.  Does anyone disagree or have any better suggestions.  

 

Many thanks.

Jerry

Honored Advisor
Howard Acheson
Posts: 1,135
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
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Re: Welcome…

I believe you spoke to someone who didn't know what they were talking about.  First, both the P&L poly and the P&L varnish are resin products.  The poly uses a urethane resin while the varnish uses an alkyd resin.  Both are varnishes and there is absolutely no incompatibility with the P&L 38 and the P&L Poly.

 

However any poly finish will have reduced adhesion when another coat of finish (alkyd or poly) is applied.  Therefore you need to scuff sand the poly finish with 280 or 320 grit paper to get proper adhesion.

Howie..............
Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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Let’s back-up just a bit …

Jerry;

 

… and make sure we are on the same page.  I took your original post to simply be an inquiry about a varnish that would give you a “light look”.  In reading our question again I see the possibility (perhaps probability) that you are in the middle of a project in which you have already begun to apply poly.  So, for clarification, are you looking for a replacement varnish or are you looking for a product that you can apply next to (and atop) the now discontinued P&L R11?

 

Why might this be important and why have both P&L and Waterlox given you that advice you received?  By way of background, all varnish (polyoneverythane is varnish) is composed of a drying oil and a resin.  (This article may be helpful to your understanding.)  But, when combined in the manufacturer of varnish all drying oils and all resins do not produce the same properties; the same attributes in a varnish product.  If they did there would be no reason for different varnish formulations.  Cutting to the chase, the primary attribute of urethane resin varnish is somewhat superior abrasion resistance.  But, when used in applications where abrasion resistance is not a primary or even secondary requirement, the negative baggage of polyoneverythane can be significant.  Urethane resin, when cooked with a drying oil to produce varnish results in varnish molecules that are significantly larger than those produced in either alkyd or phenolic resin varnish.  This leads to a finish film that resides more on the surface (less able to bond with the cell structure of wood) and a finish film that exhibits significantly poorer adhesion between coats of varnish; even coats of poly unless each coat is thoroughly sanded to provide a mechanical bond.

 

It is the well known issue of poor adhesion that has prompted the advice you received from both P&L and Waterlox.  This is not an issue of ignorance on the part of these spokesmen.  Indeed, it is the result of knowing exactly what they are talking about in the real world of giving advice to amateur/hobbyist/home woodworkers.  As Howie has said, urethane resin varnish should be thoroughly scuff sanded between coats to improve adhesion.  Going a bit further, even bare wood should not be sanded beyond 220P before the first coat of polyoneverythane is applied.  But in the real world of woodworking we have woodworkers who sand bare wood far beyond 220 and who sand between coats of finish to ridiculously high grits in the mistaken belief that doing so will yield a superior finish.  We even see woodworkers who regularly use steel wool between coats which is an open invitation to poor adhesion. 

 

So, in your technical service job with a high quality finish manufacturer you take a call from a woodworker whose understanding of finishes you cannot judge, whose experience cannot be measure and whose willingness to understand and follow instructions is unknown.  He asks you about applying your alkyd resin soya oil varnish or your phenolic resin tung oil varnish over poly.  How will you respond?  Can these things be done?  Sure!  But, in the real world if something goes wrong it won’t be the fault of the finisher, it will be due to faulty finish… 

 

Steve 

Finishing & Refinishing Forum Host
Contributor
jfisher25713
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎05-20-2013
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Re: Let’s back-up just a bit …

Thank you very much Steve.  It makes sense now.  I really apprecaite all the advise you have provided.

 

Looking liking I will have a very successful project.

 

Jerry

Contributor
jfisher25713
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎05-20-2013
0

Re: Welcome…

Hi Howie:

 

That makes sense.  Appreciate the help, the fella who gave me the advice was the P&L rep.  Your advice makes much more sense.

 

Thanks again,

Jerry

 

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