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Veteran Contributor
Thomas D
Posts: 138
Registered: ‎05-30-2010
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Filling brad nail holes in cherry

I have a cherry shelf that has holes from the brad nailer. any recommendations for filler? I have some Elmers and also some Minwax walnut colored wood putty that is to be put on AFTER the finish. The finish is Minwax poly shades antique walnut.

 

This isn't a big project, but just want to get it right.

 

Thanks

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Scott Holmes
Posts: 170
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

You are planning to put walnut PolyShades on cherry?   Why?

 

 

 

 

Scott

Finishing is an 'Art & a Science'. Actually, it is a process. You must understand the properties and tendencies of the finish you are using. You must know the proper steps and techniques, then you must execute them properly.
Senior Advisor
Woodburner
Posts: 2,838
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

I suggest you test it and see how it looks before putting it on final project.

I usually save some saw dust from project wood and   press it into dent . You can glue it in or sometimes I just press it in just prior to applying finish.  Dab a bit of finish on it and let dry for a spell.

 

Leo

LEO
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Veteran Contributor
Thomas D
Posts: 138
Registered: ‎05-30-2010

Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

 

"You are planning to put walnut PolyShades on cherry?"   Why?

 

Because that's what I want to do. That's why.

 

 

Thanks for the other posters suggestions.

Honored Advisor
ynoT
Posts: 10,474
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

Thomas,

 

Me thinks you missed Scott's point completely.

 

Reason he asked why you want to use particular stain, was to obtain info what look were you trying to achieve.

 

Tony

"Why worry about things you can't control when you can keep yourself busy controlling the things that depend on you."
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Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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It is probably a given…

Thomas;

 

…that you are using PolyShades® “because you want to”.  Even Minwax doesn’t have the power to force anyone to use this stuff.  Unfortunately, your response pretty much ended any further suggestions with respect to your chosen finish.  If I may, however, I will proceed on the assumption that your objective is/was to obtain a darker, more aged cherry finish.  I can think of no other reason to color cherry with a walnut stain.  Given that (if it is accurate) PolyShades® comes with some baggage that you could avoid (or could have avoided) with a different approach.  PS is nothing more than Minwax polyurethane with a heavy pigment load added—it is stain in which the binder is the topcoat.  While on the surface this may seem to be a good idea; in practice, putting this much opaque pigment in a finish presents some very real problems.  Even commercial pigment based toners do not include anywhere near as much pigment as is found in PS.  The biggest of these problems is the tendency of PS to streak if the finish film laid down is not perfectly uniform.  Beyond that, the heavy pigment load in the finish necessary to provide both “stains and topcoat” in one step significantly diminishes the subtle (and not so subtle) grain and figure features of the wood to which it is applied.  In the DIY segment of the market (the target audience of PS) these deficiencies may not be an issue when PS is applied to the typical unfinished furniture project.  But, when finishing furniture and cabinetry projects, especially those made from more desirable and expensive hardwoods, most experienced woodworkers/finishers would like to achieve their objective without sacrificing the clarity of the wood being finished.

 

A better approach (in my view) would have been the application of a water-soluble dye.  Many flavors are available that would impart the same red/brown tones to cherry without the grain and figure robbing opaque pigment film.  I would then have applied a clear topcoat in the sheen of your choice.  Finally, before the last coat of finish was applied I would have filled the brad holes with a color coordinated finishers wax stick selected to match the color of the shelf.  These filler sticks are available from a number of sources in both sticks and tubs.  Simply pack the filler into the holes, wipe away all excess not in the hole and apply the last coat of finish.

 

If you have already gone the PS route you may want to hold this option in reserve for your next project.  I suspect the visually different result produced will eliminate any future desire to use PolyShades®, unless you are forced to do so…:smileyhappy:

 

Steve         

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Veteran Contributor
Baketech
Posts: 86
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
0

Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

[ Edited ]

 


Thomas D wrote:

I have a cherry shelf that has holes from the brad nailer. any recommendations for filler? I have some Elmers and also some Minwax walnut colored wood putty that is to be put on AFTER the finish. The finish is Minwax poly shades antique walnut.


Thomas,

 

I could be reading this incorrectly, but if you need to fill some holes after finishing, have a look in the Varathane aisle. They have several shades of post-finish nail hole fillers. They can be mixed together to match your shade if needed.

 

 

Veteran Contributor
Thomas D
Posts: 138
Registered: ‎05-30-2010
0

Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

I took the question as questioning why I wanted to use that finish. I didn't ask what finish I should use, just how to fill the holes. I am just making a quick shelf to hang on the wall at a summer home. Nothing fancy. Just trying to get a half way decent look.

Veteran Contributor
Baketech
Posts: 86
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
0

Re: Filling brad nail holes in cherry

[ Edited ]

Yeah, that's just the local Poly Police...

 

Fwiw, I think they mean well, but they can come on a bit strong occasionally... :smileyindifferent:

 

Don't let it get you down...good luck with your project.

Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
0

Excuse me…

Don (a.k.a. “Baketech”);

 

..but your gratuitous reference to the “poly police” has absolutely nothing to do with this thread.  The only mention of “poly” is completely secondary to the discussion; Minwax makes PolyShades® from poly (thus the cleaver name).   The whole point of my comments to Thomas has to do with the amount of pigment added to the product.  Any varnish to which this much pigment is added would be subject to the same problems.  So, if anything, your shot should have been directed toward the “pigment police”!

 

Now, if you are taking issue with my observations about the negative impact of this much pigment in varnish (forget the PolyShades®) leading to my suggestion that water-soluble dye would have been a better option, based on my assumption of the purpose of the “stain”, that might be a useful discussion.

 

Finally, permit me to point out that your suggestion of the “Varathane aisle” to solve the problem of the nail holes is virtually identical to mine.  I just did not identify a specific product…

 

Steve   

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