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Honored Advisor
RussBoyd
Posts: 7,835
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Accepted Solution

Cutting board SHINE

How do I get a good shine on my cutting boards, or is it possible (and stay food safe, of course)? I have done mineral oil two coats and then mineral oil/beeswax for the third coat. Hand buff? Mechanical? Not going to happen? As always, I appreciate any and all input.

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Advisor
Scott Holmes
Posts: 170
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Cutting board SHINE

What I do on cutting boards is mineral oil and parfin wax combo.  On the edges/ends ONLY I use a light coat of super blonde de-waxed shellac to give the edges/ends a bit of shine (this also seals them every well).

 

 

Scott

Finishing is an 'Art & a Science'. Actually, it is a process. You must understand the properties and tendencies of the finish you are using. You must know the proper steps and techniques, then you must execute them properly.
Honored Advisor
Howard Acheson
Posts: 1,136
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
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Re: Cutting board SHINE

Mineral oil or oil/wax treatments will never give a high gloss.  At best you will end up with a soft sheen.

 

Only film forming finishes produce high glosses.  And, you don't want to use a film finish on a cutting board that will be chopped or cut on.  It will immediately damage the finish allowing water and contaminates to get into the wood and a film finish is difficult to repair.  If the board is going to used stricly as a "show" board, a film finish is fine.

 

While it seems you already are using the process, here is the answer to cutting board treatments.

 

An excellent treatment for wooden food preparation surfaces like cutting boards and butcher blocks is a mixture of mineral oil and either paraffin or beeswax.  This is what is used on many commercial wood surfaces.  It will last longer and be more protective than just mineral oil.  Mineral oil can be found in most supermarkets in the pharmacy section or in a true pharmacy.  Paraffin is found in the canning section of the store or in a hardware store.  

Heat the oil in a double boiler and shave in some wax.  The exact proportions are not critical--a 5-6 parts of oil to one part of wax will work fine.  Stir the mixture until all the wax is liquefied.  Apply the mixture heavily and let it set 10-12 hours or overnight.  Next day do it again and continue until the wood will no longer absorb the finish.  Let it set for 10-12 hours and then lightly scrape off any excess.  Then buff it with a rag.

Reapply whenever the wood begins to look dry.

Never put a wood board in the dishwash

 

Howie..............
Honored Advisor
RussBoyd
Posts: 7,835
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
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Re: Cutting board SHINE

Thanks guys. Kind of what I thought.

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Honored Advisor
ynoT
Posts: 10,516
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0

Re: Cutting board SHINE

Russ,

 

Only time I did that was because my Brother asked me to.

He was going to use it as serving tray, not fopr cutting.

 

Otherwise, it's not useful at all to apply finish.

 

Tony

"Why worry about things you can't control when you can keep yourself busy controlling the things that depend on you."

 

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