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Veteran Contributor
Freznel
Posts: 141
Registered: ‎11-02-2009
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Bread Board

So I made my own version of the bread board in this months edition. Now the article says that they used water soluble polyurethane, but I remember reading that it isn't the best for food surfaces even if it is no toxic. Does anyone recommend something that is non-toxic and that is non-allergenic? Thanks,
Mike
Honored Advisor
amateur60
Posts: 1,664
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
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Re: Bread Board

If a film finish of any sort is appropriate this waterborne finish won't create health issues. By the way, water soluble isn't correct, water is a thinner that assists in the procress of applying the finish,  but after it cures the finish is no longer dissolved in water. 

 

 I don't know how it is to be used?  If bread is to be cut on it, then no film finish would make sense.  Neither does a film finish make sense for a board used in forming bread. 

 

Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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The best finish…

Mike;

 

…for any sort of working cutting board or wooden counter top is either mineral oil or mineral oil into which paraffin wax or bees wax has been melted in a ration of about 1 part wax : 5-7 parts warm mineral oil.  A film forming finish, whether oil-based varnish or water-borne acrylic will quickly fail when cut upon.  If the board is to be used only for bread (cutting or making) than no finish at all works very well.  When making cutting boards selection of the wood is more important than the finish. 

 

As an aside, Amateru60 is quite correct.  A water-borne acrylic finish (with or without a bit of urethane resin added) is not dissolved by water.  Water is simply the carrier in which the finish is borne making it easier to apply.  The solvent is glycol ether.  These finishes are subject to damage from household cleaners that contain ammonia.  Water-borne finishes also lack resistance to water-vapor…

 

Steve

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Veteran Contributor
Freznel
Posts: 141
Registered: ‎11-02-2009
0

Re: The best finish…

So I went to the store and picked up some mineral oil. It says the weight is extra heavy. Does this need to be cut with water or should I apply straight oil to the bread board?
Mike
Honored Advisor
amateur60
Posts: 1,664
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0

Re: The best finish…

[ Edited ]

Mineral OIL can't be cut with water! 

 

It should be fine as is.  You could thin with paint thinner, but that would accomplish little.  You could warm the oil to reduce it's viscosity if you want but that too has little effect since the oil cools to the temperature of the wood almost immediately as it is applied.     

Veteran Contributor
Freznel
Posts: 141
Registered: ‎11-02-2009
0

Re: The best finish…

amateur60, thanks for all the help. The bread board came out great. I should be uploading pictures tomorrow of it after the oil sets.
Mike
Honored Advisor
Steve Mickley
Posts: 1,567
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
0

Mineral oil…

Mike;

 

…doesn’t “set”.  It doesn’t cure and it doesn’t dry.  That is the whole point of using mineral oil in these applications.  Here is a link to an article on Cutting Board Finish that you may find helpful.  Perhaps the two most important attributes of mineral oil, or mineral oil combined with paraffin wax, are:

 

First, since mineral oil is a non-drying oil the oil continues to penetrate into the wood, ultimately completely filling the cell structure of the wood over time and, with successive applications.  This is the same penetrating ability that gives (and has given) old butcher shop cutting blocks the oily feeling that makes them such desirable cutting surfaces.

 

Second, since mineral oil is a petroleum distillate (it is not vegetable oil) it can never go rancid and it will not serve as a food source for life forms feeding on the oil and creating health issues for the user.

 

Finally, “Extra Heavy” can most probably be viewed as a marketing term.  Mineral oil is a product of fractional distillation.  It boils out of petroleum at a specific temperature and as such it is what it is.  It is virtually free of other petroleum components.  Thinning it with another petroleum distillate (i.e. paint thinner/mineral spirits) would simply return impurities that have already been removed; aliphatic solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.  There is nothing desirable to be gained by thinning mineral oil.  Since it does not dry or cure; since it always remains liquid and does not evaporate, it is ideal in your application without thinning…

 

Steve   

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